Immunotherapy

“Immunotherapy, once a forgotten field of research relegated to the smallest meeting rooms and low-profile journals, has become the rising star of cancer treatment.”

Advances in biology and technological developments have revolutionised immunotherapy. In the past few years, a number of immunotherapies have been developed to block inhibitory signals in cancers and activate T-cell-mediated anticancer responses, with FDA approvals for the treatment of a number of deadly cancers. Importantly, these responses are often durable with minimal toxicities, providing improved quality of life for patients with previously terminal diagnoses.

Ultimately, immunotherapy will become a first-line therapy for many cancers, which when combined with other treatments such as localised radiation, oncogene-targeted therapies, and even low-dose chemotherapy, will augment efficacy while reducing the side-effects of these previously established treatments.

Immunotherapy, once a forgotten field of research relegated to the smallest meeting rooms and low-profile journals, has become the rising star of cancer treatment. But the field is still in its infancy. Now is the time for a coordinated and concerted effort that rewards innovative science.

Immunotherapy