Cancer imaging

“The combination of cancer imaging and therapeutics can deliver cancer-targeting and pharmacokinetic information that can suggest whether a therapeutic approach could be effective. Once a therapy is administered, these approaches can be used to assure the therapy is working or needs to be changed.”

Precision oncology relies on highly specific targeting of cancer or other key cells in the tumour microenvironment and identifying malignant lesions to help select a treatment that will be effective. In-vitro diagnostics, cancer imaging, and radionuclide therapy have important roles in tailoring treatment to an individual’s unique biology, making therapy more effective and reducing costs.

The combination of imaging and therapeutics can deliver cancer-targeting and pharmacokinetic information that can suggest whether a therapeutic approach could be effective.

Once a therapy is administered, these approaches can be used to assure the therapy is working or needs to be changed. This combination can therefore be a highly cost-effective measure for expensive therapies.

Imaging is also useful for prediction and assessment of drug-induced, end-organ toxic effects and can be used to detect subclinical drug-related toxic effects that could have major implications on management decisions, especially if early imaging studies also suggest the treatment is ineffective.

The move towards precision medicine will be facilitated by supporting research, education, and training on targeted radionuclide therapy and increased production of imaging and therapeutic radioisotopes. Collaboration is needed across federal agencies, academia, and the pharmaceutical industry.

Cancer imaging